Question: Is An AED Required By OSHA?

When should I not use an AED?

You should not use an automated external defibrillator (AED) in the following situations:Do not use AED if victim is lying in water.Do not use AED if chest is covered with sweat or water.Do not put an AED pad over a medication patch.Do not place AED pad over a pacemaker (hard lump under chest skin).More items….

Can you use an AED with a bra on?

Bras need to be cut for AED electrode pads to be placed properly. Some women may have smaller breasts that will not fall out of the way. As with a man, hand placement is the sternum between the nipples. Since the bottom hand fingers are extended, they may touch the woman’s breast.

Do you give CPR if the person has a pulse?

Assess for breathing and pulse. If the victim has a pulse and is breathing normally, monitor them until emergency responders arrive. If the victim has a pulse but is breathing abnormally, maintain the patient’s airway and begin rescue breathing. … If at any point there is no pulse present, begin administering CPR.

Does an AED expire?

Typically, an AED battery will have three dates printed on it: a manufactured-by date, an install-by date, and an expiration date. An AED battery should be used within five to seven years of its manufacturer date. … And the expiration date indicates when the battery will no longer function.

How quickly should an AED be used?

AEDs (Automatic External Defibrillators), when used swiftly-in the first 3-5 minutes of a person collapsing-have been shown to dramatically increase the survival rate of people suffering from cardiac arrest.

Is an AED required?

There is no national requirement that employers provide AEDs in the workplace; even so, all 50 states have enacted laws or regulations for the devices. … Some states require that schools be equipped with AEDs, while others mandate their availability at health clubs or other fitness facilities.

Is AED safe?

Yes, it is safe to use AEDs in all weather conditions. However, if at all possible, move to shelter and keep the victim protected from inclement weather. If the victim is lying in water, move him or her to a relatively dry area before using the AED.

Can someone get in trouble for using an AED?

Any individual who is trained to use an AED and who uses one in good faith in an emergency will not be liable for any civil damages. A person who provides CPR and AED training to a person who renders emergency care is not liable for any civil damages.

Can you use an AED without training?

How do I use an AED? Using an AED is very simple – anyone can use one, and no training is required. Once you open the case and turn the device on, it will automatically start to give voice prompts instructing you what to do.

What are the 5 steps involved in using an AED?

Part 2 – Using an AEDStep 1: Locate and fetch the AED. In order to save critical minutes, it is best if the location of the AED is known. … Step 2: Make sure the patient is dry. … Step 3: Turn on the AED and prepare the patient’s chest area. … Step 4: Attach the pads to the chest. … Step 5: Deliver the shock, if advised.

How far away should an AED be?

Currently there’s no research that indicates a recommended coverage area for an AED, however achieving a 3-minute response time should be the primary guide to making placement decisions.

How many AED do I need?

Except in the case of a small building, it is usually recommended that a minimum of one AED unit be placed on each floor. It is also recommended that you calculate the response time using a route that includes stairs as opposed to an elevator. Any area that is difficult to access should have its own AED unit.