Question: What Are The 5 Universal Precautions?

What is the difference between standard and universal precautions?

Standard precautions were developed by the CDC to synthesize the major features of universal precautions, which were designed to reduce the risk of transmission of bloodborne pathogens, and body substance isolation, which was designed to reduce the risk of transmission of pathogens from moist body substances..

What diseases are airborne precautions?

Diseases requiring airborne precautions include, but are not limited to: Measles, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), Varicella (chickenpox), and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Airborne precautions apply to patients known or suspected to be infected with microorganisms transmitted by airborne droplet nuclei.

What is the most common method of spreading infection?

Contact transmission is the most common form of transmitting diseases and virus. There are two types of contact transmission: direct and indirect. Direct contact transmission occurs when there is physical contact between an infected person and a susceptible person.

How do you prevent cross infection?

Five Things You Can Do To Prevent InfectionClean Your Hands. Use soap and warm water. … Make sure health care providers clean their hands or wear gloves. … Cover your mouth and nose. … If you are sick, avoid close contact with others. … Get shots to avoid disease and fight the spread of infection.

Who developed universal precautions?

Universal precautions were introduced in the US by CDC in the wake of the AIDS epidemic between 1985 and 1988. In 1987, the practice of universal precautions was adjusted by a set of rules known as body substance isolation. In 1996, both practices were replaced by the latest approach known as standard precautions.

What PPE is used for standard precautions?

Standard precautions consist of the following practices: hand hygiene before and after all patient contact. the use of personal protective equipment, which may include gloves, impermeable gowns, plastic aprons, masks, face shields and eye protection. the safe use and disposal of sharps.

Why are universal precautions important?

Universal precautions are intended to prevent parenteral, mucous membrane, and nonintact skin exposures of health-care workers to bloodborne pathogens. In addition, immunization with HBV vaccine is recommended as an important adjunct to universal precautions for health-care workers who have exposures to blood (3,4).

What are the 5 basic principles of infection control?

Introduction.The general principles of infection prevention and control.Hand hygiene.Using personal protective equipment.Safe handling and disposal of sharps.Safe handling and disposal of chemical waste.Managing blood and bodily fluids.

What are airborne isolation precautions?

Airborne Isolation Precautions Airborne precautions are used when you have a lung or throat infection or virus, such as chicken pox or tuberculosis, that can be spread via tiny droplets in the air from your mouth or nose. These germs may stay suspended in the air and can spread to others.

What are examples of universal precautions?

Universal precautions include:Using disposable gloves and other protective barriers while examining all patients and while handling needles, scalpels, and other sharp instruments.Washing hands and other skin surfaces that are contaminated with blood or body fluids immediately after a procedure or examination.More items…

What is universal precaution in nursing?

Universal precautions are intended primarily to prevent parenteral, mucous membrane, and non-intact skin exposures of health care workers to blood borne pathogens; therefore, they apply to blood and to other body fluids containing visible blood.

What are the 3 methods of infection control?

There are three types of transmission-based precautions: contact, droplet, and airborne. Contact precautions are used in addition to standard precautions when caring for patients with known or suspected diseases that are spread by direct or indirect contact.

What are standard precautions and when should they be used?

Standard precautions are a set of infection control practices used to prevent transmission of diseases that can be acquired by contact with blood, body fluids, non-intact skin (including rashes), and mucous membranes.

When should standard precautions be used?

Standard Precautions are used for all patient care. They’re based on a risk assessment and make use of common sense practices and personal protective equipment use that protect healthcare providers from infection and prevent the spread of infection from patient to patient.

What are the 4 main universal precautions?

Standard Precautions apply to 1) blood; 2) all body fluids, secretions, and excretions, except sweat, regardless of whether or not they contain visible blood; 3) non-intact skin; and 4) mucous membranes.

What are the 10 standard precautions?

Standard PrecautionsHand hygiene.Use of personal protective equipment (e.g., gloves, masks, eyewear).Respiratory hygiene / cough etiquette.Sharps safety (engineering and work practice controls).Safe injection practices (i.e., aseptic technique for parenteral medications).Sterile instruments and devices.More items…

What are the universal precautions in first aid?

Universal Precautions are implemented when administering first aid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation or any procedure where the potential for exposure to blood or any body fluid is present. Body fluids include saliva, sweat, vomitus, tears, intestinal and urinary tract materials.

What is the most effective way to prevent infection?

Hand washing is the single most effective way to prevent the spread of infections. You can spread certain “germs” (a general term for microbes like viruses and bacteria) casually by touching another person.

Why is standard precautions important?

Standard precautions are meant to reduce the risk of transmission of bloodborne and other pathogens from both recognized and unrecognized sources. They are the basic level of infection control precautions which are to be used, as a minimum, in the care of all patients.

What precaution is TB?

Germs that warrant airborne precautions include chickenpox, measles, and tuberculosis (TB) bacteria infecting the lungs or larynx (voicebox). People who have these germs should be in special rooms where the air is gently sucked out and not allowed to flow into the hallway. This is called a negative pressure room.